the world on fire; new art, end of summer.

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my current interest/deal.

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the crew . i love these fine people.

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i have the spice.

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seattle tattoo convention.

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with some of my heroes.

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devil shin is nine years old, well healed and settled in.

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i also saw the eclipse and retreated to the forest.

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the world is on fire.

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“gathering” show ending, Feb 2

show is ending. if you bought pieces you can pick them up; giveaway piece will be going out on the third, and the remaining pieces will be listed on our shop page for sale!

 

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over the holidays, December ’16

a few recent things.

 

I’ve added a few of the skull mounts to the shop section, I’m still photographing them and figuring out shipping costs.

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tender prey: rat spider skeletal articulation

rat skeleton spider taxidermy mount articulationrat skeleton spider taxidermy mount articulationrat skeleton spider taxidermy mount articulation

Published on: Mar 16, 2012

the trio, bat taxidermy

taxidermied bats

Three taxidermy bats- two indonesian bats (chemically preserved) and one northwest bat, humanely collected, preserved with salt, disinfectant materials, and time, (completely mummified and sanitary) and mounted on a birch plaque with mouse and vole bones and preserved hawkmoths and cicada shells. All have been sanitized and dried completely, handled with care.

I adore bats. I think they’re amazing, beautiful creatures, and I have been donating to a few projects meant to combat white-nose fungus, which has been killing off bats across the Americas for a while now. It’s really sad because bats keep all insects in check, plus they are ADORABLE.

Ships nestled carefully in protective packaging, to the US only. $200 includes shipping, handling, tracking, and insurance (USPS)

Plaque is approximately 6×15″. Bats are mummified completely, all bones are sealed and odorless.

skulls, bones, dead things, and where they come from.

Originally published on 11/16/2013

raccoon skull mount taxidermyI want to talk a little bit about my materials. Mainly because I read a lot of forums and craft and art blogs, and tend to see the same comments over and over about artists that work with taxidermy or animal remains.

Nature isn’t cruel or kind; it’s just hungry. 

I get a lot of questions about various things I use- mostly about bones and skulls, but a lot of people have asked about other things too- plants, rocks. Usually people are just being dense- “did you kill all those raccoons?” or “who do you have buried in the crawlspace?” or, even better, “ewwww it’s dead!” A lot of people saying this also eat fast food, buy meat at the grocery store, and let their cats roam outdoors…

I work humanely- in a sense. I don’t kill anything to make my art but yes, they are real bones and skulls. I get them from a lot of different sources. Most of the game animal bones and skulls I get from hunters- I have friends who hunt for food, and who will give me remains to work with. Most of the deer, elk, and turkey skulls and bones I use come from these sources. I also get bones from family farms- chicken, pig, and goose or turkey bones, even a few ostrich and cow remains. Most of these animals are also killed for food.

I don’t use anything from factory farms, just farms where the animals are treated well. I know this is enough to upset some people but since I also eat meat I don’t feel bad about it- I WOULD feel awful using factory-farmed items. However if I came across some, or had a source, I might use them; that piece would probably be pretty damned dark though. I tend to work with the feelings the animal’s remains give me, to make a piece that expresses the creature’s life.

I know a lot of artists who work with animal remains are a bit more humorous than I am, or more light-hearted about it in general. I do see the remains as a medium but at the same time I don’t feel good making jokes at the animal’s expense. Very rarely I get a skull or part which is light, and happy- I will sometimes make a brighter piece with those. Usually though animals live difficult lives, and their bones speak to me about this, so I don’t work very light very often.

I get questioned partly I think because of artists that do slaughter animals in the context of their work. While I don’t do this, I don’t find these artists offensive at all, it’s just not my own way of working. I don’t think it’s horrible. I have hunted for food myself, and been present for slaughtering at farms. Again- I don’t think it’s awful if you eat at KFC, either. I just personally don’t.

Some of my pieces come from road strikes. I have been working steadily on a series of photographs and an extended essay about roadside nature and roadkill, about human safety and how highways affect the animals that live near them. As a consequence of this work I have come across a LOT of roadside remains. I did get a license to collect roadkill in several states (not all states need one, but some do) and have spent a great deal of time working with these remains. A lot of these wild animals are obvious survivors of repeated injuries (fractures and old healed injuries in their skeletons attest to this) and the way they interact with the road fascinates me.

skunk skullNo, I have not used anything I myself ran over.

Most of my feathers come from friend’s farms. Almost all of my plant matter comes from my own place- I live on the edge of the Siuslaw, and not only the yard/forest of my house but the clearcuts nearby furnish most of my lichens, moss, and wood. I do a lot of beach collecting too. I live in Oregon, and it is legal to collect many things here, since all beaches are public. I do refrain from collecting in park areas, since those are restricted. I also don’t collect or mess with the remains of pinnipeds, or vertebrate fossils- just invertebrate fossils, collected in nonrestricted areas.

I have a few skulls and things which I have purchased. A few mink, fox, and beaver skulls which I am certain are fur trade castoffs- these items have a very dark feeling to them, and so the pieces built with them reflect that. I also have used vervet monkey skulls- the importation of these was a pain in the neck, and they are killed as a nuisance animal- so they too have a very dark feeling. Like I said, the horrors of life, death, the hard times most animals go through, are the reason my work is not light-hearted and silly. I don’t use anything illegal, and I avoid using items which may violate CITES or the MBA. (More information on the legality of animal remains is available here, if you are interested.)

I don’t work much with animals that are domestic pets, but I occasionally get some materials this way. Usually these are used for commissions for the previous owner. Some of these are more light and happy. I’ve worked with a very battered stray-dog skull, just making that piece was very upsetting. It wasn’t a joke to me.

zpg, anti-breeding artI’ve worked with human bones too. This is where people tend to be most alarmed- although in reality it is easier to buy human bone than many animals! I get most of my human bone specimens from places which sell vintage anatomical displays, or from places such as necromance (among others) which sell oddities. Yes, these bones are legal. No, I didn’t kill anyone to get them. And YES, they are expensive for a reason. Again- most of these works are dark. I don’t get silly feelings from death.

I’ve sold work and done commissions for vegans- for people who are animal and conservation activists. My work is intended to speak about the way people are oblivious to the natural world. Nature is full of drama, death, struggle, and strangeness. I try to use the materials I have to portray that. Reminders of mortality are not for everyone. Horrific art is not for everyone. There are people who cannot sit through a horror movie and people who cannot listen to a description of how their hamburger was made. My work is not for these people, really- although knowing that my work may have given them pause or made them think about these things, about the darker side of life, is kind of the point.

Originally Published on: Apr 19, 2012

rat spider…(redacted reference to the movie, dead alive)

horror, weird taxidermy mount, skeleton articulationWhat I finished today. I also started a huge full-sheet landscape, but that won’t be done for a while yet.

I’ll be building three of these creepy little monsters- this one, another for a friend as a commission, and then a slightly larger rat-size one. This one is made of a full mouse skull, rat jaws, bird and mouse and rat bones, possum vertebrae, bone glue, and oil pigment.

It’s on a tiny coffin lid, and hangs on the wall, for all your horrorfully-decorated rooms. I think he would do best in a library, in a genetics lab, or in a tattoo and horror fanatic’s studio or office. But what do I know? It might be that he is happiest in your nightmares.

This one is for sale, the second has already sold.

banned on etsy: her roses

human arm bone articulation. banned on etsy!

Apparently, despite many other listings of legal human bones, THIS one is unwelcome on etsy.

Their explanation? “Despite the fact that it is legal in your locale, etsy considers it to fall under the “illegal animal parts” clause of the TOS.”

In other words, the law is what etsy says it is.

Moving on.

 

Update: etsy has now included human parts as forbidden items, along with any thing  that has “health claims”.

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